Setting up a Visual Studio 2017 Environment

*Disclosure: This post may contain affiliate links, meaning, at no cost to you I may get some coffee money if you click through and make a purchase.

Intro

Hey all, so today I’m going to give you a quick run through for setting up a development environment using Visual Studio 2017 Community on Windows 10. There will be a tutorial on how to do this on a Linux environment with a different IDE but for now as I will be focusing on Visual Studio for development.

Not much else to say there, let’s get into it…


Steps:

Up to date Windows 10

The first thing we want to do is ensure that our Windows 10 development machine is up to date.

  • This can be found in Settings -> Update & Security -> Windows Update

Download Visual Studio 2017

Now we are happy our machine is up to date next we want to download the Visual Studio 2017 installer. So the next thing we want to do is download Visual Studio 2017

  • There are other versions available for those with the required Key or Subscription level, they are:
      • Visual Studio 2017 Professional
    • Visual Studio 2017 Enterprise

We will only be looking at Community Edition, but the steps will be the same.

Install Visual Studio 2017 Community Edition

  • Once you’ve downloaded Visual Studio lets install it

  • Double click on the installer
      • You’ll find it in your Downloads folder normally set to ‘C:\Users\<Your Username>\Downloads’
    • You may need to approve the installation via the User Account Control authorisation window. I assume as you are here you’re happy to install Visual Studio 2017, so click ‘Yes’

  • Next up will be to review Microsoft’s Privacy Statement and Software Licence Terms
    • Pretty standard stuff.
    • Click ‘Yes’

  • The Installer will then fetch and install some additional dependencies

  • So, now we get to configure our Development Environment. For our purposes I’m only going to choose those components we MAY want to use in the future, that is components I intend to use in any posts I make. You can, of course, install any components you wish outside of my choices. So we will want:
      • .NET desktop development
      • Desktop development with C++
      • Universal Windows Platform development
      • ASP.NET and web development
      • Azure development
      • Python development
      • Data storage and processing
      • Mobile development with .NET
      • Visual Studio extension development
    • .NET Core cross-platform development

NOTE: You will need to ensure you have enough space to install the components. Please see the red box the above image it shows the ‘Total space required’ for your configuration.

    • You can change where you want the installation to go, see the green box in the above image
      • In some cases, some of the components will have a set installation path which you cannot change.
  • That’s it, for now at least, the Visual Studio Installer will now install Visual Studio, this will take a little while. Could be worth grabbing a brew or something and if you haven’t done so already check out some of my other posts.

Start Visual Studio 2017 Community Edition

Great, so Visual Studio should now be installed for you, I recommend you restart your machine but it’s not necessary. Let’s open Visual Studio now then, there’s a couple of ways to do this:

  • Start Menu
      • Open the Start Menu using the Windows key
      • Scroll to ‘V’ named apps
    • You will see ‘Visual Studio 2017’, click it.
    • Desktop Shortcut
        • Navigate to your desktop, press Windows Key + D
      • Double click, ‘Visual Studio 2017’
  • Search bar
      • Open the Start Menu by pressing the ‘Windows Key’
      • Type ‘Visual Studio 2017’
    • Visual Studio 2017 will now be in the Start Menu Best match options

There will be some configuration we need to do as part of our first startup

  • You’ll be asked to sign in to your Microsoft account if you have one.
    • If you don’t, I’d recommend you get one and sign into it.
    • If you do, sign in
      • Especially if you have an MSDN subscription
  • Next up and nearing the end, some simple IDE configuring
    • Leave Development Settings as ‘General’
      • Though feel free to look into this in more detail and selection and option more suitable for your plans
    • Then choose your Color Theme

We are done, Visual Studio  2017 will now be installed and you can take a look round if you want.

Hopefully, my steps were useful and you managed to install it. If you have any problems feel free to get in touch and I’ll help in any way I can (though I imagine you’ll likely google any issues).

Next up then we’ll make a very simple C# application, should be out shortly.

Aaron

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